I didn’t realize the National Anthem was a banger, NFL

Remember how Colin Kaepernick started kneeling during the United States National anthem in 2015 because he was protesting about African-Americans and police brutality? Kaepernick was first sitting during the anthem, but then, started a taking a knee along with former teammate Eric Reid during the anthem, as part of his peaceful protest.

He then also backed up his protest by raising money ($1 million)  to various causes and communities across the country, becoming a hero and an actual “patriot” for many for standing up for what he believed in, unless you’re in a certain base.

Kaepernick is still looking for work, while horrible backup quarterbacks continue to be signed. Even Robert Griffin III got signed by the Baltimore Ravens this off-season, and the last we saw him, he was stinking it up for the Cleveland Browns two seasons ago. 

The narrative about Kaepernick has been written in numerous articles about how he’s a bad quarterback, and that he was asking for too much money. This narrative has been proven to be wrong this week because most teams in 2016 saw Kaepernick as a starting quarterback, if not a guy who should be on a roster. Due to the fact that Kaepernick has a pending case about all 32 NFL teams having collusion not to sign him, I doubt he’ll play in the NFL again. 

Players across the NFL started protesting with Kaepernick about the part of racial injustice, while giving their money (and time) to assist those in these various communities who wouldn’t have a voice. I wrote a blog about how the current President of the United States hates how people “disrespect” the anthem and the flag, which led to misinterpreting a known message by the majority of individuals who don’t watch Fox News every five minutes.

The current president then turned this into a wild weekend in September where he called out these players at some rally and believes that if you exercise your free speech during the anthem, you should be deported (This is the same president that said Nazis were very fine people back in August). 

Yesterday, in a less than stunning fashion, the NFL owners voted for its players to either come out and stand for the anthem, or stay in the locker room during it played. But if you’re out there, you’re going to stand for the anthem and respect the flag because if you dare protest during it, it’s a 15 yard penalty and fined by the league (I’ve been laughing at this for the last 24 hours).

Dan Rooney, the guy who has a rule in the NFL that African-American coaches be INCLUDED in head coaching interviews (you really can’t make this up), said that the gestures such as a raising a fist and linking arms would be considered disrespectful. 

I’ll repeat this for those who probably scrolled and nodded in the beginning —

The protests were NEVER about the national anthem. It was never about the flag. It was never about the military. It was about protesting for African-Americans who continue to be harassed by police officers across this country because of the color of their skin. If the NFL cares about patriotism, then maybe they should started by not accepting payments from the Department of Defense to display their sense of patriotism.

The NFL doesn’t give a shit about patriotism. The NFL doesn’t give a shit about the military. The NFL doesn’t give a shit about breast cancer. The NFL doesn’t give a shit about domestic violence. The NFL doesn’t give a shit about its players because if they did actually care about their players, they wouldn’t have organized this without them yesterday, the players would have guaranteed contracts, and the dreaded Thursday night games would be discontinued due to safety concerns. 

But –

The NFL gives a shit about money.

That’s all owners like Jerry Jones see. Dollar signs. I’ve learned that the owners and people upset about the anthem protests were never mad about the national anthem. I’m generalizing here, but most people upset about the anthem protests probably were buying beer at the concession stands during games, or sitting down on their couch because the National Anthem doesn’t slap (Vince Staples, salute to you).

Most were/are upset because of the message behind it, which, well, this is America, you know, the same country that has a school or mass shooting every six weeks and wonders how it could have been avoided.

I don’t know what’s going to happen this fall with the NFL – well that’s a lie. The ratings will continue to be high. People like myself will probably draft a fantasy football team (I might retire though) just to keep the eyes tuned on it. I’ll still have my eye on my favorites like Juju Smith-Schuster, Adoree Jackson, Odell Beckham Jr, Sam Darnold, and the goat himself, Baker Mayfield.

But as for watching a full game and actually caring? Man, I don’t know. I’m not here to be the moral police, but NFL games have been TERRIBLE in the past three years. You’d be a fool not to believe it. 

The NFL and its owners have the belief that they created a solution when in fact, the owners created a messier situation than they needed to because they want to silence their athletes. Texans owner Bob McNair said in a meeting months ago compared the players to “inmates,” and how these same inmates should not be running the asylum. He made those comments over a protest for people, specifically African-Americans not to be brutalized by police officers. Tone deaf. 

If the original message that Kaepernick had was about the military and how as a country, we should take better of our veterans, then the NFL and it’s fake patriotism ass would have 25 minute gestures before games.

A simple solution would have been not bring this issue back into the limelight if this was uncomfortable for the majority of these owners. Nobody was really paying attention to it anymore. Instead, the NFL created a situation that is a lose-lose for them, aligned themselves as a pinata to the President, and when it goes south in the long run, they’ll have nobody to blame but themselves for terrible crisis management. 

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HERES A JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE THINKPIECE SINCE THE INTERNET LOVES DOING THINKPIECES ON EVERYTHING

 

halftime was a typical justin timberlake performance, if you’ve been paying attention for the last 4 years.

if you don’t like him, whatever. that’s your opinion, and honestly, i could care less.

however –

stop crying and using these big ass words to attempt to prove a point that doesn’t need to be proved. we get it. or at least i get it.

nobody forced you to watch the halftime show. there’s no need to watch a halftime show just to thinkpiece it to death when you most of you bitched about him getting the nod in October as most of you claimed to boycott the NFL anyway.

if you’re mad at an artist for performing his hits at a halftime show and playing it safe by having himself instead of bringing out lance bass in 2018…………………………………………….

yeah okay, 2018 internet.

if you gonna spend time over a thinkpiece,  maybe spend the energy writing about how pathetic it was that dodge used MLK in a commercial during black history month instead of crying about justin timberlake at the halftime show.

one day, it’ll all make sense. congrats to the eagles. haters gonna say it’s fake, tho.

 

 

… and you can tell everybody

Colin Kaepernick has been the subject of jokes over the years by the homies and myself for a number of reasons.

  1. In his peak as a quarterback in the NFL, we clowned this dude because we said he  looks like Squidward from Spongebob Squarepants.
  2. He’s always on instagram talking about how the “7torms are coming,” replacing the s with a 7. Dude, no.
  3. His ability to play quarterback has been on the same path like Aubrey Graham’s ability to finally make a quality album. It’s done. Over.

In the midst of the jokes that we’ve had about Kaepernick over the years, I can’t deny that in his absolute peak as a NFL player under Khaki god Jim Harbaugh he was really, really good but polarizing. Some for his ability on the field and his lack of going through progressions which is normal, I guess. Lots of it stemmed from people who couldn’t stand the fact that he wasn’t your “typical” quarterback in the league. People saw this guy as a thug and called him a douchebag because he wouldn’t wear a suit to press conferences, instead going with a sweater and beats by dre because that was comfortable for him.  Continue reading … and you can tell everybody

Seattle wins the super bowl? What?

Back in August, I picked the San Francisco 49ers to win the Super Bowl, which most people were debating between them and the Seattle Seahawks. However, I added a disclaimer at the end of my preseason NFL blog:

 I can’t wait to come back to this in February, laugh about how wrong I was, and write a blog publicly apologizing to Pete Carroll and the Seattle Seahawks for not picking them to win it all.

WELP. I guess I gotta own up to it even though I sort of predicted it.

Uncle Pete Carroll,

I’m sorry that I doubted (well not doubted, I figured the Seahawks would win next season) you. I’m sorry that me, being a Seattle-area native picked against you even though you’re my favorite coach because we share something in common . I’m sorry that even though I was semi accurate, I’m completely sorry that I didn’t pick you in the beginning of the season even though I picked you to dominate the Denver Broncos on Saturday night on Twitter and even said it’d be by two touchdowns. I mean, it wasn’t, but you get the point.

Remember USC vs Oklahoma in the 2005 Orange Bowl, and the media coverage around that game? It was eerie similar to the coverage heading into this game. We knew that Denver’s offense was record-breaking all season long. We knew that Peyton Manning is one of the greatest quarterbacks to ever play the game, so naturally, it was “expected” for Denver to put points up on the board, just like how Oklahoma was supposed to beat USC (55-19 was the final score. SEE?)

Seattle’s defense was dominant all season long, and continued to show their dominance holding Peyton and the Broncos to 8 points. I was not expecting Seattle to score 43 points, let alone win a Super Bowl by 35 points and make Peyton Manning look like Jason White (see what I did there?). Pete Carroll joins Jimmy Johnson and Barry Switzer as the only coaches to win a AP national title and Super Bowl title, and the great thing about that? Carroll did it HIS way. Instead of changing his coaching style from the way he coached at USC, he enhanced it and he not only rebuilt Seattle with a bunch of guys who were 5th-6th round picks, he turned these guys into champions very quickly.

For the first time since 1979, the city of Seattle wins a major professional sports title, and as scary as it seems, they could repeat seeing how they’re still young and their core is there.

So congrats Seattle, embrace being on top of the football world now.

An Uneducated Guess: the QBs of the 2014 NFL Draft Class by Kyle Madson

I am not an NFL draft expert. I do not have the time or the resources to be an NFL draft expert. I don’t have film to study or a DVR to watch recorded games. What I do have are bits and pieces of games I watched on Saturdays, as well as a bunch of murky narratives I cooked up in my head, based mostly on the art of comparing current players to past players.

Therefore, I will be putting together several lists containing my thoughts on some of the top NFL prospects in the 2014 draft class.
The following is my less-than-educated take on the top 14 NFL quarterback draft prospects based on CBS Sports’ rankings. Take everything I say with a grain of salt, and chase it with a shot of penicillin.

Teddy Bridgewater, Louisville, JR
Bridgewater is widely considered one of the best quarterbacks in college football. Given that he plays at a smaller school and isn’t the clear-cut best quarterback in this draft, he will likely be a force on Sundays. Plus, what he lacks in football abilities, he makes up for with an NFL-ready name.

Derek Carr, Fresno State, rSR
No. See: Carr, David.

Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M, rSO
Johnny Football is the poster child for college stars whose on-field dominance is over-shadowed by his off-field escapades. If he can keep his head on straight, he’s Russell Wilson. If he can’t, he’s Todd Marinovich.

Blake Bortles, Central Florida, rJR
I watched one game of his and all Brian Griese would talk about is his athleticism. When athleticism and a big arm is all a quarterback has going for him, chances are it’s not going to translate to the NFL gridiron. Griese was throwing around names like RGIII and Steve Young. I see Jake Locker … at BEST. Teams shouldn’t bother drafting this guy.

AJ McCarron, Alabama, rSR
An average college quarterback that rode a couple of elite running backs, some dominant defenses and one of the best coaches ever to unparalleled success. Bottom line – he isn’t that good. Don’t get caught up in his intangibles – he’s basically Matt Cassel.

Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois, SR
I haven’t watched this guy play one down of football, but he’s played four years at Eastern Illinois, which naturally means he’s going to be the best QB in this draft. For the love of all that is holy, take this guy with the No. 1 pick because he has all the makings to be the steal of the draft.

Zach Mettenberger, LSU, rSR
Stop it. Zach Mettenberger stinks.

David Fales, San Jose State, SR
Played in a pass-happy offense in a non-AQ conference. Mr. Fales, Colt Brennan is on line 1.

Brett Smith, Wyoming, JR
Never watched him, but Garoppolo already has the Cinderella story of the draft wrapped up. It’s probably time Smith start looking for work in a different profession.

Tajh Boyd, Clemson, rSR
I feel so bad for Boyd. I was so certain he was going to be a monster this year, enter the NFL and be Tom Brady. Alas, since I am always wrong, he turned out to be not as great as expected and will likely fizzle out in the League. Sorry, Tajh.

Aaron Murray, Georgia, rSR
My man-crush on Murray will doom him to the same fate as Boyd. His NFL ceiling has gone from Aaron Rodgers to Alex Smith.

Stephen Morris, Miami (FL), SR
I found myself scratching my head a lot watching Stephen Morris play quarterback. He isn’t ready for Sundays and will not be very good. However, he does have a big arm so he’ll stick around as a backup for awhile.

Logan Thomas, Virginia Tech, rSR
No. He went to Virginia Tech. That’s a big enough red flag for me, and it should be a big enough red flag for NFL scouts.

Garrett Gilbert, SMU, rSR
My lasting memory of Garrett Gilbert is the 2010 National Championship game. Yuck.

If you have a question or comment, leave one on here or tweet me at @Madsports8 .